Posts Tagged 'healing'

Vinyl Moon by Mahogany L. Browne

Genre: Realistic Fiction

Angel was forced by her mother to move across the country to live in New York with her Uncle and start a new life. She misses her siblings terribly, but if she’s honest with herself she doesn’t blame her mother for trying to get her out of a challenging situation. Her Uncle is very kind to her and tries to help her get settled at her new school. She has a seminar class called H.E.R. which stands for Her Excellence in Resilience and Honoring Everyone’s Roots where she and her classmates are free to share and learn about each other. Angel becomes immersed in her lit. class where she has access to all kinds of amazing authors she previously never had time for since she was helping to raise her younger siblings. Reading these stories by authors such as Toni Morrison and Zora Neale Hurston gives her some time to reflect on her own situation and the choices she had made at her old school. Can she overcome her past to heal both inside and out? Can she focus on herself instead of worrying about everyone around her? Can she make new, authentic friends and find a way to shine at this new school?

This book is hard to put down until the very end. Angel is such a dynamic character and even though readers do not know for awhile what situation she is running from, it is obvious she is trying to heal in multiple ways from some terrible event. The way the author weaves in her poetry is also really engaging because it helps shine a light on Angel’s feelings in a way that prose can’t. The characters are all really interesting too, considering many of them only appear a handful of times yet are so memorable the reader welcomes them back each time. Recommended for readers looking for something that will make them think, because this book will lead readers to thinking about a variety of things long after the last page has been read.

All This Time by Mikki Daughtry and Rachael Lippincott

Genre: Romance

From the same authors as Five Feet Apart, this romance story begins with Kyle learning that his longtime girlfriend is actually not going to go to the same college as he is on their graduation night. There is a terrible storm and as they fight about their future together they get into a terrible accident where Kyle is seriously injured and Kimberly dies. He struggles for months to heal and get up every morning knowing that Kimberly is gone. He shuts out friends, puts college on hold, and generally fails to progress in any way. Then, he meets Marley and everything starts to change. Marley has also lost someone close to her and the two of them begin to work through their grief together, but as they begin to find happiness they feel overwhelming guilt that they are here and those they lost are not. Both of them harbor guilt about how their loved one died as well. Kyle can’t help shake the feeling that something will come along to disrupt his happiness because he doesn’t think he deserves it, and something definitely does but it’s something you won’t see coming. Can he fight for what he had with Marley or is it just not the right time?

This story definitely keeps the reader guessing as the plot takes some serious twists. Kyle’s relationship with Kimberly has kept him from truly living his best life and he’s starting to realize that, but also feels terrible about the fact that Kimberly is not there anymore. Marley, meanwhile, has faced some terrible things as well and because of that struggles to truly open up and believe in happy endings and forgiveness. Recommended for fans who enjoy unique romance stories such as The Fault in Our Stars and Eleanor and Park.

Shark Girl by Kelly Bingham

Genre: Realistic Fiction

Age level: 14 and up

# of Pages: 276 p.

RAC Book: Yes

Jane, a fifteen year old girl, gets attacked by a shark when her and her family go to the beach one summer day. Despite the fact that there were many people around, the only person to help her was her older brother who pulled her out of the water. Jane ends up having to have her arm amputated, which is extra hard for her because she was a talented artist. The story is told through a variety of poems in which Jane expresses her feelings about every aspect of this catastrophe such as the tape of her getting attacked that was played over and over on the news, the numerous letters she gets from supporters, and even her own feelings about trying to draw again. Jane’s feelings come across as very natural and understandable for a young girl in her position. As time goes on her thoughts reflect her healing process.

This story is honest and compelling in the way it describes how Jane copes with losing a limb in her teenage years. There are many supporting characters who help Jane in her journey to recovery such as her best friends and a young boy who has recently lost a leg that she meets at the hospital. She has a strong support structure around her, but in the end it is up to her to take those important steps toward acceptance. The content is unique for young adult literature and should be very popular among young readers.


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