Posts Tagged 'coping'

Hold Still by Nina LaCour

Genre:  Realistic Fiction

# of Pages:  229

RAC Book:  No

Caitlin is having a difficult time coping with the suicide of her best friend, Ingrid.  Her parents keep trying to help her by creating projects for her and offering her space, but she cannot seem to feel normal again.  When a new girl in school, Dylan, tries to befriend her Caitlin feels guilty for having fun with someone else.  One day, Caitlin discovers Ingrid’s journal under her bed.  Slowly, she reads each entry and learns a lot about Ingrid she never knew.  She feels bad that Ingrid did not feel she could talk to her about her issues and wishes she could have helped, but also realizes she must begin to put her life back together.  She picks up her photography again and begins building a tree house in order to show everyone she is moving on, but not forgetting.

This book does have a few graphic scenes and some raw language, but many students will really identify with it.  The different feelings Caitlin has are portrayed so realistically that any reader feels like he or she has experienced this terrible loss.  Caitlin’s slow progression toward acceptance and healing feels natural and healthy and the people along the way who help her are engaging side characters.  Anyone who enjoyed Thirteen Reasons Why will enjoy this title as well.

Advertisements

Shark Girl by Kelly Bingham

Genre: Realistic Fiction

Age level: 14 and up

# of Pages: 276 p.

RAC Book: Yes

Jane, a fifteen year old girl, gets attacked by a shark when her and her family go to the beach one summer day. Despite the fact that there were many people around, the only person to help her was her older brother who pulled her out of the water. Jane ends up having to have her arm amputated, which is extra hard for her because she was a talented artist. The story is told through a variety of poems in which Jane expresses her feelings about every aspect of this catastrophe such as the tape of her getting attacked that was played over and over on the news, the numerous letters she gets from supporters, and even her own feelings about trying to draw again. Jane’s feelings come across as very natural and understandable for a young girl in her position. As time goes on her thoughts reflect her healing process.

This story is honest and compelling in the way it describes how Jane copes with losing a limb in her teenage years. There are many supporting characters who help Jane in her journey to recovery such as her best friends and a young boy who has recently lost a leg that she meets at the hospital. She has a strong support structure around her, but in the end it is up to her to take those important steps toward acceptance. The content is unique for young adult literature and should be very popular among young readers.


Archives

Advertisements